Patrick Christys Tonight : GBN : July 9, 2024 3:00am-5:01am BST : Free Borrow & Streaming : Internet Archive (2024)

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money on to be the >> who's your money on to be the next tory party leader? >> i'm having lots of conversations with colleagues, but underlying all of this , of but underlying all of this, of course, we have to talk as a unified party. >> joe biden has yet another shocker. >> i'm staying in the race. >> i'm staying in the race. >> yeah, yeah, full clip to follow. but what would you do if you were on this plane? watch very closely. yeah. oh, good grief. well, there we are. not sure i'd fare that well there on my panel is columnist at the express, carole malone . express, carole malone. journalist benjamin butterworth and founder of global britain is amanda bogle. oh, and, what on earth is going on here? >> they're really running at our car . oh, dear >> they're really running at our car. oh, dear. >> get ready britain, here we go .

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>> get ready britain, here we go. soft on crime. soft on the causes of crime. next. >> the latest from the gb newsroom at just after 9:00. and the main news tonight is that rishi sunak has announced his interim conservative shadow cabinet. that's the first the party has led for more than 14 years. most of the former cabinet shadow their old roles, with james cleverly taking shadow home secretary and jeremy hunt as shadow chancellor. but the former foreign secretary, lord cameron, and tory party chairman richard holden of both resigned. andrew mitchell is now the new shadow foreign secretary, while richard fuller , secretary, while richard fuller, former economic secretary to the treasury, is the new conservative party chair. kemi badenoch is now shadowing angela rayner on housing and levelling up, but it's not yet clear how long these appointments will be in place as rishi sunak

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confirmed last friday that he has every intention of resigning . has every intention of resigning. well, the new labour government has admitted today the summer will be challenging as the first boat full of migrants since the general election crossed the engush general election crossed the english channel. this morning. the group of 64 illegal migrants was intercepted by a border force vessel and taken to a migrant processing centre in dover harbour . and then this dover harbour. and then this afternoon, another boat also attempted to make the crossing but failed. it brings the total number of migrants crossing so far this year to more than 13,500. that's up 12% on the same period last year. 13,500. that's up 12% on the same period last year . and it same period last year. and it comes after sir keir starmer announced the rwanda scheme is, in his words, dead and buried , in his words, dead and buried, claiming he's not in the business of gimmick politics. well, the prime minister has concluded a whistle stop tour of the uk to reset westminster's relationship with the devolved nations. sir keir met with

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political leaders at stormont as part of his first official visit to northern ireland since taking up office. he was accompanied by his new northern ireland secretary, hilary benn, the prime minister, of course, in scotland at the weekend. so after northern ireland went on to wales, where he met with the first minister, vaughan gething at the senedd amid concerns about the tata steelworks in port talbot, where thousands of people are facing redundancy. in news away from politics, andrew tate and his brother have both been accused of serial tax evasion. the social media influencer and his brother tristan have been accused of failing to pay any tax on £21 million of revenue from their onune million of revenue from their online businesses. devon and cornwall police is bringing a civil claim against the brothers, and a third person, referred only as j. the force is investigating, recovering around £28 million scattered in seven £2.8 million scattered in seven frozen bank accounts , an frozen bank accounts, an application the three defendants are contesting. and just lastly,

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in the united states, at least two people have lost their lives. we understand as hurricane beryl hit the southern states and particularly texas, the storm has forced the closure of major oil ports, with flights also cancelled. as well as cutting power supplies to more than 2 million homes and businesses . hurricane beryl businesses. hurricane beryl strengthened to a cat five storm before weakening to a tropical storm, the world meteorological organisation saying it's setting the tone for a very dangerous hurricane season ahead . those hurricane season ahead. those are the latest gp news headlines for now, i'm polly middlehurst. i'm back in an hour with more. >> see you then for the very latest gb news direct to your smartphone , sign up to news smartphone, sign up to news alerts by scanning the qr code, or go to gbnews.com forward slash alerts . slash alerts. >> soft on crime . soft on the

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>> soft on crime. soft on the causes of crime. welcome to labour britain, where 40,000 prisoners could now be released early new prisons ministerjames early new prisons minister james timpson has previously had this to say about prisoners . to say about prisoners. >> we have 85,000 people in prison. it's going to go up to 100,000 pretty soon. a third of them should definitely be there. there's another third in the middle, which probably shouldn't be there . be there. >> well, he was in charge of the pfisons >> well, he was in charge of the prisons reform trust, which on its website lists its aims as reduce the use of prison and improve conditions for prisoners. it also puts a massive focus on race, diversity and equality training in prisons. it's also worth having a look at who our new justice minister is. shabana mahmood was part of a group of people who forced a sainsbury's in birmingham to close in 2014, reportedly when she protested outside with pro—palestine activists. she said we lay down in the street and we laid down inside sainsbury's to say we

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object to them stocking goods from illegal settlements . that's from illegal settlements. that's israel, by the way, and that they must stop . we managed to they must stop. we managed to close down that store at peak time on saturday. this is how we can make a difference. she has spoken out against stop and search, complaining about the way the powers are disproportionately applied to people of black and asian backgrounds. home secretary yvette cooper in 2014 called for an urgent overhaul of stop and search, including banning stop and search targets for police officers . there is a theme here, officers. there is a theme here, isn't there? labour is considering letting 40,000 people out after just considering letting 40,000 people out afterjust serving people out after just serving 40% of their sentence, while also vowing to take back control of the streets and smash the knife crime epidemic. well, look, given that black people are apparently four times more likely to be murdered than white people and unfortunately, quite often it is other people from within the black community who are committing knife crime. i wonder how the taking the knee anti stop and search pro early release labour party will achieve its aims. sir keir

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starmer signed a letter to get violent criminals off deportation flights and back out onto the streets, one of whom went on to kill a man with a machete. it will only take one of keir starmer's criminals to kill somebody on early release, and there will be a massive backlash. let's get the thoughts of my panel tonight, though. daily express columnist carole malone joins us alongside journalist and broadcaster benjamin butterworth and founding chairman of global britain. it is ammon bogle. carlile, i'll start with you on this . do you carlile, i'll start with you on this. do you think it's right that labour should be considering anyway, letting 40,000 prisoners out of prison after they've served about 40% of their sentences? >> congratulations on your wedding, by the way. thank you very much. i just want to say, and this really is the get out of jail card free, isn't it? it's a real life get out of jail card free. you know, he keeps doing this now. he said he's going to send the 90,000 illegal migrants who are who were earmarked for rwanda. he's going to he's going to what's the word

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when you when you give them a, a pass to stay. what's the word ? pass to stay. what's the word? >> well, a claim for asylum. yeah. >> amnesty. he's going to give those 90,000 amnesty. now he's going to let you know 40,000 people out of prison. now that that's not solving the problem, that's not solving the problem, that's just actually kicking it into the long grass. so what you're going to do is put a whole load of criminals. so a murderer life sentences 15 years. they serve 8 or 9 now. so in effect with this, a murderer is going to serve about five and a half years. that's outrageous. you know, for every crime there is the victim of crime. and it this does not consider the broken victims of these violent criminals. and to just let them back out on the street and not imagine there's going to be a huge problem as a result of that, is outrageous. and i can see where this labour government is going. they've got a they've got a guy called timpson, james timpson, and he's one of the leftie elitists who thinks that every violent criminal is actually a decent person who just had a bit of a hard life. well, i'm sorry, you know, when you murder somebody, when you rape somebody, when you when

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you're a paedophile, you know the difference between right and wrong. whether you came from a working class, poor environment or not. okay. >> i mean, i imagine that james timpson, obe would deny that he thinks that every single violent criminal is a good person, but he thinks that only a third of the lads are in jail now, should be there. >> so that's kind of, you know, that's quite a big well, there's one way. >> yeah. i mean, there's one way of looking at it, isn't there, which is that, you know, are you able to get back into work after you've served your sentence? is there much point in putting people in prison, then rendering them unemployable for the rest of their lives? that would be a burden on the taxpayer, the punishment. >> you know, we have a thing in this country. our justice system this country. ourjustice system depends on the mantra. the the justice must fit the crime. and that's not happening. >> well, that's the thing. and, benjamin, i wonder when you take this 40,000 people in isolation and you think, right, okay, well, that's something you also add in that the prominent members of this labour government now have been anti stop and search, you know, being quite pro blm. and we saw the kind of riots that took place stateside as a result of that. the new justice minister has reportedly been, you know committing some. well i say low

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level criminality. you could argue civil disobedience is probably a better way of putting it yourself. shutting down a sainsbury's in birmingham, you wonder, are these really the people to clamp down on crime in our streets, >> well, yes , i would say. and >> well, yes, i would say. and you know what? what was really shocking about this, because to call it keir starmer criminals as you did in your opening, is just nonsense. this really shows just nonsense. this really shows just how close to the brink britain was of crisis after 14 years of tory mismanagement. we know that the justice secretary, the four fs, the justice secretary, alex chalk, had told the prime minister, rishi sunak in may that we are about to have no prison cells left and we need to release some people and it said that that's one of the reasons why he called an early election, because he knew he would have to. >> i mean, labour could just build more prisons. now, on the day that they've announced sweeping planning reform and saying that they're going to do that, they're going to, you know, do all of that stuff. i mean, the other option would be for them to build more prisons, not release them. >> can i just say that since 2020, the tories have built two

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new prisons and they were in the process of building a third so that it's not like they've done nothing in the past four years to have just 700 vacant cells in britain. that's just a horror show committing crimes. >> it's a horror show. and so, you know, the fact is, and keir starmer did say this before the election, which i thought was very honest of him. i watched an interview just 24 hours before polling day where he said there will be no magic fix and you will be no magic fix and you will have to release some of these people. >> okay, look, i think what we're hearing here is just more excuses of this, this hopeless government. >> look, let's let's let me read you something out. patrick. this was in the labour manifesto. victims must have faith that justice will be delivered and criminals will be punished. that's what the labour party went on doorsteps with in their manifesto. releasing prisoners out of prison goes absolutely against that. we saw we've already. >> why do they need to be released? a man? >> well, there's no sound, but if you look, let's just let's work through so. >> so why why, why why put why put this. no no no why put this in the manifesto then. why not say in their manifesto. hold on a second, guys. if we get in, we think they're not enough prison cells and this is what we're going to do. that's not what you said. >> record repeatedly. >> record repeatedly. >> no, this is in the manifesto.

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>> no, this is in the manifesto. >> but what matters is the manifesto. the country has just rejected your party in the biggest fashion they ever had, what with the majority that the labour party has got the shallow majority, the least number of votes come off it. >> the reason, benjamin, let's let's stay on topic is let's stay on topic, your government, let's stay on topic. >> do you understand that. >> do you understand that. >> no, no. do you do you understand what your your party has set a precedent for? let's go back to sadiq khan. >> you won't answer the question on day one. in opposition, on day one of his mayoralty. >> what did he do? he stopped. stop and search. we have formed from labour politicians being soft on crime, being soft on criminals. >> but, you know, we've stopped the policy of stop and search in government. >> this guy theresa may, this tory home secretary. >> okay, so this guy timpson is a big believer in rehabilitation, >> rehabilitation does not work in this country. a guy called sir martin who was head of prisons in 2020, he said, forget. he said scrap them, throw them away. he said all the all these schemes inside six weeks and six months. he said those schemes do not change a lifetime of crime, someone's

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lifetime of crime, someone's lifetime of crime, someone's lifetime of crime. he said. they just don't work. so. so this is what timpson is going to do. he's going to he's going to focus on rehab. it doesn't work. >> the issue, the issue that keir starmer is going to have is if these people or dare i say it in some of the cases, unfortunately, when these people are released early and then go on and kill somebody or reoffend in some kind of serious way, then he's going to have to deal with the backlash for that. and i think that is coming, isn't it, benjamin? >> i mean, first of all, you can't get around the fact that the only reason there's a shortage of space is because that's what they've inherited in the past few days. >> so you don't think it's so and so here's the part where i said the tories have built two prisons. so it's got nothing to do with with the new prisons minister who is on record. we know where he stands on all this. this is the ideological one. this is ideological. >> it's not because it is. you're 700 cells from not having any. so you're about you're about sorry, can i just point out, you know, it's really important, like the government's previous government stance was that they were telling judges that they were telling judges that people accused of crimes are convicted of serious crimes.

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>> well, we did not have a conservative government releasing prisoners. >> i get that, but it's a question of deterrence, isn't it? and in the next hour, we're going to be talking a bit more about the lack of deterrent. now for people wanting to cross the channel. so there's that issue. but i just wonder with this now, the people celebrating, i mean, if they weren't already, the people of hmp wandsworth, of course, for a variety of different reasons. but people celebrating in prisons under the food trucks , they'll be they'll food trucks, they'll be they'll be, you know, they'll be parties weren't there now for people in prison and say, oh, good. great. you're looking around. there's a labour government. we're going to be out early, lads. >> look on this side of the channel we'll have prisoners inside prison cells celebrating a starmer government and the other side of the channel. we have people who want to break the law and enter the country by breaking that law, celebrating. what does that tell us? it tells us this government is going to never forget. >> the heart of all of this are people who have been victims of these violent people . what does these violent people. what does it look like to them? what do they feel like knowing that that that they're what i think of them is actually just i think it's fair to say we've had lawless london, we're about to

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get lawless united kingdom. well, i think so. >> i mean, a man is treating the pubuc >> i mean, a man is treating the public like idiots. he expects them to believe that the reason there aren't enough police cells is because of a labourjustice is because of a labour justice secretary in two working days. >> well, we weren't the ones releasing prisoners. >> it is exactly what a man is saying. and do you know what can i just say? if you want to cheat the public like idiots, if you want to. >> not the only people who treat it properly like idiots are this are this manifesto for a long time, victims must have faith that justice will be delivered. that was the labour manifesto. >> bearing in mind that the last government said that you shouldn't put some of these people in prison in the first place because the cells didn't exist. the choice you have is either you don't put someone, for example, who's just been convicted of rape in prison, or you release someone who's done five years at that stage on good behaviour. but that's not what they're saying. >> you have to do something really hideous now to get sent to prison in the first place. >> simpson is doing so. >> simpson is doing so. >> there aren't cells. >> there aren't cells. >> well, yeah, but to say that it's only the really hardened criminals that are in prison already. so to not send them for doing something hideous and heinous is entirely those two. >> there's very much two ways of looking at this, which is that this is a tough decision that

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needs to be made, and it's a choice between that or literally not sending anyone to prison, i suppose. and that is definitely the case that benjamin, the labour party will make. the other aspect of this is that there's no deterrent. now really, or less of a deterrent for people leaving prison, and it's going to make our streets even more dangerous. and with the removal potentially of certain stop and search rules as well, how do they combat things like knife crime? but still to come after 64 illegal migrants arrived in dover harbour today, the first group to cross the channel under a labour government. what can reform uk do from the back benches? to stop this, i'll be joined by reform's rising star and apprentice to nigel farage nato yousef. he'll be live in the studio and is the new foreign secretary. david lammy more interested now in identity politics than actually doing the day job? >> a descendant of enslaved people, a black working class man from tottenham . man from tottenham. >> but up next, does 22 year old sam carling, labour's youngest mp, have enough experience to be in parliament? political commentator susan evans and ceo

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of the youth vote, alex cairns. they're going head to head on this. i want to know what you think. is 22 too young? patrick christys tonight on gb news

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welcome back to patrick christys tonight. coming up. can reform have any influence on labour's immigration policy? as the first illegal migrants under starmer's

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government arrived today? but first, should there be some kind of age requirement to be an mp? it's time for tonight's head to head. it's time for tonight's head to head . so labour's sam carlin head. so labour's sam carlin became the baby of westminster after he won his seat in north—west cambridgeshire at the age of just 22, making him the first member of parliament. born in the 21st century, the cambridge university graduate ousted 63 year old ex—tory minister shailesh vara, and here's what he had to say to his critics yesterday. >> i've been renting insecure housing in the private sector for quite a while now, so it's i always get a little bit frustrated when people mention life experience, because no one has yet been able to explain to me why being older makes you better at the job. >> well, he's obviously got a lot of brains, hasn't he? but tonight i am asking , should tonight i am asking, should there be an age requirement to be an mp? let me know your thoughts. go to gbnews.com/yoursay. tweet me @gbnews while you're there, go and vote in our poll. but first, going head to head on this, our

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political commentator suzanne evans, and the ceo of youth vote alex, can. suzanne, i'll start with you. if that's all right. i'm having a look at this chap now. i mean, i suppose on paper he's quite well qualified, certainly academically. six stars at a—level, university of cambridge doing natural sciences. he's been a local councillor . what's wrong with councillor. what's wrong with having a 22 year old mp? >> well i think i went into politics when i was 45 and i remember feeling very strongly that one. >> i think i'm quite good at this. i should have done it a bit sooner, but also feeling very conscious that i don't think i'd have had the life experience or indeed the emotional intelligence or the kind of just the thick skin really to deal with it. had i been any younger. and i think ultimately politics is about pubuc ultimately politics is about public service. it's not about you. it's not about what you can get out of it. it's not about how good you think you are. it's about what you can do for the people of your constituency and how you can best benefit them. and certainly some of the casework that i came across when i was working, even as a local councillor, was really quite gritty and quite tough, and you

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need to have a lot of life experience. you need to know your way around the system, and your way around the system, and you need to be able to have that breadth of experience in order to be able to help people satisfactorily. satisfactorily really. agent itself, of course, is not a defining factor and never should be in anything really. but i think it is very sad that we have a lot of people in parliament now who basically haven't had a proper job outside haven't had a properjob outside politics or university in this particular case, and whilst i'm sure sam, i hope he makes a very good mp and i'm sure he'll do his level best, he seems to be a very dedicated, hard working, entrepreneurial sort of guy. i do worry that he really hasn't got the breadth of experience and background to be able to understand where his constituents are coming from and what their needs are. >> all right, alex, i'll throw it over to you now, just on this, you know, i'm going to rattle through this is this is on his on his linkedin page. all right. so we've got university of cambridge. he's a councillor and academic supervisor there. he's been on cambridge city council. he was the debates officer at cambridge union. he's

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a student union president. classic, he's been part of their labour club, bishop auckland constituency labour party youth officer. he went to barnard castle school in durham, which apparently cost you a cool £32,000 a year. what is missing from this cv, i believe, is any kind of job. is that a problem? >> i don't think it's a problem. i think sam is going to turn out to be a very, very good mp. you know, he's someone that's been a councillor for the last two years. he's probably had to deal with quite difficult cases in cambridge. he was actually on the cabinet, for the city council. so he's had experience at probably a little bit more difficult level than just doing, you know, things like bins and potholes. and actually when we think about this, i don't remember everyone criticising people's life experience when they're 45 and 50. that's probably if we went through lots of mps life experience, you know, we would probably find that lots of them are probably not, you know, any more qualified than than sam. and actually when we think about this, he's probably got a lot of emotional intelligence. he's a highly educated person. i heard

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his his bbc interview talking about, you know, a range of topics that he wants to tackle. and actually we want parliament to be proportion, you know, representing the country. you know, at the moment, there aren't many mps under 30. probably the average age of an mp is definitely not anyone near his age. so there's actually something really good about having a young person that can make sure that labour do build all those houses for young people and make sure that young people's perspectives are heard, because let me tell you, they're not heard . normally when you not heard. normally when you have a bunch of over 60 year olds that normally run for parliament, well, i do get that. >> but, you know, he left school four years ago. suzanne, i just want to again, you know , this is want to again, you know, this is just based on this. it doesn't even look like it's even worked in a pub. you know, it doesn't even seem like he's necessarily had that that first job, real world experience. and kyle. but wonder whether or not it's quite easy actually to sit there and say, well, i've got all these big ideas , but has he ever big ideas, but has he ever actually done anything of note in his life other than read books and do a—levels ? books and do a—levels? >> it certainly doesn't sound like it from the cv that you've

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just read out, but just can i correct something about the average age of parliamentarians is actually, i think it's around 51 at the moment. so it's not just a load of old people over 60. >> there's a bunch of over 50. susanna well, what's your point ? susanna well, what's your point? >> what do you what do you do? how low do you go here? we're talking about votes for 16 year olds. the rule in this country is that if you're old enough to vote, you're old enough to stand for election. do we really want 16 year old mps? you know , 16 year old mps? you know, somewhere there has to be some common sense brought to bear here. and as i said, politics should not be about you. it should not be about you. it should be about the people you serve. and i frankly think there are far too many politicians of any age , any age in parliament any age, any age in parliament who've never had a proper job who've never had a properjob and frankly, don't know what real life is like. >> yeah, i mean, i suppose there's a couple of aspects to this. all right. because if you take someone like angela rayner or alex, i think it's fair to say, you know, she's had a different start in life and therefore maybe she was more earthed in the difficulties of real, ordinary people, the kind of proper quotes and quotes,

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working class, as it were. and you can see that there's that life experience there. but he doesn't even appear to have that, you know, he said that he grew up and the other bit on the bbc, 0h, grew up and the other bit on the bbc, oh, i grew up in a very poor working class area. well, i'm perhaps his parents owned that area, going to £33,000 a year school, then off to cambridge university. i mean, what experience has he got for business owners? what can he relate to when it comes to pensioners? what can he relate to all of these people? the only thing he seems to have is insecure rental. well, dare i say it, maybe if you'd bothered to get a job and not just be a councillor for a while, his rent wouldn't have been that insecure. >> just because you've not been a senior leader in a business, or not ran a business, or not necessarily had the jobs that they've had, doesn't mean that when he meets people in his constituency that he won't be able to quickly understand, you know, what the issue is. he's a quick learner. he's going to have staff around him. i mean, let's be really clear here, right? when we're talking about whether there should be, you know, an age limit in terms of not giving 16, 17, 18 year olds the ability to run for parliament. i don't think we should have 70 year olds running for parliament either. if we're

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going to go down that route. and actually. but why? >> okay. all right. fine. but why? why not why not have a 70 year old running for parliament? >> i mean, because because the majority of parliament, if susanna is talking about the average age is 51, the majority of the public want there to be some young mps that actually can be a little bit more relatable to them. and some older mps that will be relatable to some of the some of the electorate at the moment. you know, for a long time that's not happened because the average age is not 30. the average age is 51, if that's to be believed. and actually, let's think about the quality of mps that we've had, you know, sam, i actually think we'll go on to be actually think we'll go on to be a very good mp. but we've had people like chris pincher have had to leave parliament. you know, we've had a situation, nadine dorries, we had boris johnson, we have lots of people, but we've also had people like mori black, haven't we? >> and she was the other youngest one. i mean, it does work both ways. at least he maybe it's just a question mark generally over the kind of people that go into politics. and yeah, i just wonder whether or not there's a little bit of ageism taking place here from you, alex, when it comes to what would be wrong with the 70 year old? i mean, are you the kind of

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person who always thinks you know better than your parents? you know? is that is that the kind of the kind of youthful gen z attitude at the moment? >> not at all. what's happening now is on the right. we constantly see young people are lazy , unemployed. clearly, if lazy, unemployed. clearly, if it's a 22 year old mp, you know he's not going to have any emotional intelligence. he's not going to be able to do the job. he's not even started the job yet. you know, we're pre—empting something that's not happened. actually, i suspect he's going to become a very good mp. we've got a lot of young people in this country that can offer a lot. he's already been a councillor. he's highly intelligent. he's going to have lots of good staff around him. and i bet you if we come back in a year's time and see how he's getting on, a lot of his local people and, you know, the people in his area voted him in. if they didn't think he was experienced enough, why did they vote for him? yeah. no >> look, go on, susan, very final word quickly to you. i think this idea about they voted him in, so they must be happy with it. >> i think that's rubbish, i'm afraid, although we know that legally individuals are elected to parliament, not party political members. the fact is, it said labour on the ballot papen it said labour on the ballot paper. so people were going to vote for him. >> oh, they knew his age. so no,

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no, they knew his age. >> we are going to have to we're going to have to draw a line under it. thank you very, very much, though, both of you. that was a good head to head. political commentator susan evans, ceo of youth vote, alex kearns. who do you agree with? do you think that 22 year old sam carling, labour's youngest mp, will have enough life experience to be in parliament? sarah says a 22 year old, privately educated and fresh out of cambridge uni, will have very little life experience. he's been sheltered from the reality of life so it's ridiculous to think he would make a good mp, eliot says. how many mps of whatever age do have enough life experience? let's wait and see how well he does, rather than judging him solely by his age, shall we? and alexis says, of course he doesn't. but even more importantly, any neuroscientist will tell you your brain doesn't fully develop until you are about 25. well, i think maybe it's fair to say that his brain certainly does look as though it has fully developed. your verdict is now in 10% of you think that sam carling does have enough life experience to be an mp. 90% of you think he does not coming up, rachel reeves makes her first major speech as the new chancellor. >> we will reform the national

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planning policy framework, consulting on a new growth focused approach to the planning system . system. >> okay, so housebuilding on the green belt , >> okay, so housebuilding on the green belt, onshore wind farms, the threat of a labour tax raid. kelvin mackenzie will be with us to dissect it all. but next, after 64 illegal migrants arrived in dover harbour today, the first group to cross the channel since sir keir starmer became prime minister. what kind of an impact now can reform uk actually have in stopping these small boats? nigel farage called my next guest a future stars. is live in the studio and it's to not be missed.

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welcome back. patrick christys. tonight. still to come with rachel reeves set to rip up the planning rules. while also warning that she's inherited the worst set of economic circ*mstances since world war two. will labour's crushing majority give them a free pass to just do whatever they want? we're going to get unrivalled analysis of that from fleet street legend kelvin mackenzie . street legend kelvin mackenzie. but first i welcome the reform uk donor who turned his back on the tory party zia yusuf, now 64, migrants made the journey across the channel today , across the channel today, becoming the first illegal channel migrants under the new labour government. they've been called the star armada by some people. the crossings are expected to continue as long as the weather stays favourable, prompting fears that keir starmer's early decision to scrap the rwanda plan will

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embolden people smugglers and push more people across the channel into britain. well, zia joins me in the studio now. thank you very, very much. well, reforms election campaign focused quite heavily on illegal immigration. but with just five mps in parliament, you're up against labour's 172 mps in parliament, you're up against labour's172 seat majority. what impact now can you guys have on stopping the boats? >> well, look, i think firstly the mps that we do have five amazing mps, they're going to do everything that they can within the context of, you know, five of obviously many hundreds of members of parliament to the degree that they're able to ask questions and called upon. but obviously, nigel farage is a world class campaigner. he has done more than anybody to draw attention to this issue, not just recently, but for years. you know , he's been going down you know, he's been going down to the channel, drawing attention to the fact that this so—called border force are effectively acting as a complementary ferry service, you know, being paid for by the hard earned money of the people watching this programme. >> yeah. one of the issues with labour at the moment, and we'll come on to this later on in the show. but these planning reforms, so they also want to build 1.5 million social houses across their first term in

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office. they've also said that asylum seekers will be able to live in some of those houses. right. so i just wonder in those five seats that you guys have won, would you be able to give any kind of guarantee to your constituents? there that that will not be the case in your constituency, so you're not going to end up with a load of new houses, and they're going to be full of asylum seekers. >> well, what i can guarantee is that the reform mps will be doing everything within their power, you know, within the context of the constitutional power of an mp in this country that i power of an mp in this country thati can power of an mp in this country that i can absolutely guarantee. and highlighting it, we have, i mean, i've met them all. they're all amazing, amazing members of parliament. but look, a lot of these problems are essentially trying to look clearly we don't build enough homes. last year we built 200 odd thousand, 215,000 homes. net migration to this country was 650,000. so the population continues to explode. we can't build enough homes to house them. obviously, labour have been talking about housing, legal migrants , illegal migrants legal migrants, illegal migrants in some of these homes. these are all problems that are both a supply problem and a demand problem. right. so there's a supply issue around homes. yes, we do need to build more homes.

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we've got to do that in a sensible way with the consent of local residences. but let's be clear there's also a huge demand problem. the demand is exploding because we've lost control of our borders, because we have no coherent immigration policy. and so while labour can talk about building more homes, but it wasn't even one of their six priorities to deal with migration, you can see now the boats continue to come. there's absolutely no evidence that the problems that we've seen, and there have been huge problems under the conservative party, you're going to do anything other than deteriorate at a more rapid rate under labour. okay. >> well, we're going to have to watch this space, aren't we? but i'm quite keen to get your views on this. so reform's election campaign was accusations of racism etc. were there, of course. but chairman richard tice sought to remedy this by highlighting the diversity of some of reform's candidates. we can play a little clip of this now . how. >> now. >> apparently we're all racists . >> apparently we're all racists. apparently we're all bigots . apparently we're all bigots. apparently we're all bigots. apparently we're all xenophobes . apparently we're all xenophobes. apparently we're all xenophobes. apparently we're all far right .

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apparently we're all far right. apparently we're all far right. apparently we're all far right. apparently we hate foreigners or people with different coloured skin . and yet, and yet . skin. and yet, and yet. >> yeah. now, look, i get why you guys maybe did that, but i just wonder whether or not you feel as though that video was actually pandering to the kind of pro diversity mob a bit really? >> well, look, i think we should do. we'd be well advised to take martin luther king's advice and judge people by the content of their character, not by the colour of their skin. that's my opinion. i think the reality is, i can tell you, having met a lot of the candidates and people around nigel farage, there's people from all sorts of backgrounds of every sort of person, and they're all great people. so that's what i'd encourage people to do. i think we've got to get away, actually, from, you know, judging people on anything other than the merits of their argument. >> yeah , i did, i did wonder >> yeah, i did, i did wonder when i saw that go out again, i could see exactly why he did it, the timing of it and all of that

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stuff. and, you know, there's a point to be had there, definitely. but i did wonder as well whether or not it was maybe playing slightly into the diversity brigade's mould, but your membership, your party's membership is soaring. you're promising new heights. so growing by nearly two thirds in the last month is, according to the last month is, according to the latest stats i've got. anyway, you've now got a total of 65,000 members who each pay around £25 a year for that privilege. nigel farage believes, though, that dodgy candidates cost the party a few percentage points in the polls. he told gb news reporter charlie peters that he's now focusing on building what he says is a proper political party. >> so the next big stage is to build structure around the country, to democratise, to allow people to pick their own chairman, their own treasurers. and once you start to get organic growth at town and constituency level, then you start to find the people that might make good local councillors. so look, i'm not underestimating the magnitude of the job and i'm going to have to try to be an mp for the constituents here to be active in the house of commons and to

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lead the charge to build a national political party. it's not going to be easy for the next few months, to put it mildly. >> well, it's not going to be easy and it's not going to be easy and it's not going to be easy financially either. are you going to continue backing the party for the next five years yourself? >> well, i can tell you, i've already spoken to lots of people who are very keen to donate money to reform. i think what's been achieved in this election is remarkable. you know, 4 million votes, third in 98 seats, third largest party, by the way, done with a shoestring budget, done with nigel farage as leader for four weeks, done with no national infrastructure and done with an openly hostile press. right. all but that last one. and now i can tell you going to be in reverse. we are building a national infrastructure. we are professionalising at rapid speed. there's a lot of people who are looking to donate money. and what i will also say to the people at home, you know, the membership has grown dramatically in the last few days, i'd really encourage you if you if you enjoy, if you enjoy hearing from reform representatives, if you believe in the policy set and you really want to help make britain great

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again, please go and join us. this is a long this is a five year plan to install nigel farage as prime minister in this country. i think we've got a real chance of doing that. but we're going to need everyone chipping in and helping us on that journey. >> so you anticipating not just yourself, obviously, you know , yourself, obviously, you know, financially fortunate, well, well deserved, etc. you know, but but other people, other wealthy individuals to come forward and be giving reform quite wealthy individuals and also people who are not wealthy, right, who care deeply about their country, like the 4 million people who voted reform, like the many millions who i think are very sympathetic to the reform cause, but didn't really think that there was much chance, much use in it. >> right. because there wasn't any chance of reform are going to form a government and perceived as not really having much chance locally. this is now changing, right? for example, in those 98 seats where we came second, right? many, many seats where we came ahead of the conservative party and next time around, our argument will be simply that the tories can't win here. so not just wealthy people. there are plenty of wealthy people we're speaking to. and i'm confident will will chip in. but likewise, people who aren't wealthy, you know,

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every little bit helps and they become our advocates. you know, it's been amazing the energy and momentum. i put something on my twitter recently just showing that we're the only party which has that precious thing of momentum and enthusiasm. you know, the conservative party vote share obviously collapsed. the labour party vote last versus last time fell, and the lib dem vote votes fell. so yes, we have an unfair system in inverted commas, but we can and will win under a first past the post system. we just need to maintain this momentum. >> okay. thank you very much. great to have you on the show. thank you. chat to you again very very soon. entrepreneur and reform uk donor zia yousef. now coming up, a former border force chief has said that sir keir starmer. s plan will lead to open season in the english channel. my panel is going to debate if the migrant crisis is about to get a lot worse under a labour government, and i'm asking whether or not you can forget the hotel situation if they're going to be given permanent housing somewhere near you as well. but next, as part of her first major speech as chancellor, rachel reeves has vowed to allow homes on green belt land. ed miliband is rapidly kickstarting his eco

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agenda as well. >> onshore wind ban in england has been in place for more than nine years. we've been in government 72 hours, we've lifted it. >> yeah . so how good or bad are >> yeah. so how good or bad are these policy announcements that we're getting so far? former of the sun, kelvin is live. he's in the

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next. welcome back to patrick christys tonight. coming up. is it now? open season for small boat crossings. the star may day. they're being called coming across the english channel. but first, she's been in the forjob first, she's been in the for job less than a week. but the new chancellor, rachel reeves, has already ripped up the old tory government's planning rules, promising today to build more houses by using green belt land which had previously been protected from construction. >> nowhere is decisive reform needed more urgently than in the case of our planning system. our antiquated planning system leaves too many important projects tied up for years and

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years in red tape before shovels even get in the ground, we will reform the national planning policy framework, consulting on a new growth focused approach to the planning system before the end of the month, including restoring mandatory housing targets. >> right. okay, well, look , we >> right. okay, well, look, we do need more housing. kelvin mackenzie joins me now, former editor of the sun. so we do need more housing. is that such a bad idea? >> right. well, there's two things. >> first of all, they say they're going to build 1.5 million within five years. there is absolutely nil possibility of they're also going to put asylum seekers in some of those . so seekers in some of those. so yes, i think that will be, to my mind, enormously contentious and will lead to, i'm not saying there will be riots on the streets, but the idea that your family, you know, come from preston or you've come from, i don't know, bournemouth or somewhere like that, and suddenly they build all these social housing because 40% of all housing now has to be social, right? and suddenly you find a load of people that have arrived on a boat from iran has

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just turned up and taken the spot for you and your family. i could see that being a problem. and knowing starmer, it won't happen, okay? it will suddenly say, do you know what i've been thinking about this and i've been thinking about the shouting. i've been getting at as i walk down the street and i tell you what, i've changed my mind. now on the question of what green belt . honestly, i what green belt. honestly, i sometimes see horses in the field and i think to myself, would it be such a bad thing if they built some houses and actually moved that horse to another field? so i'm quite understand. they clearly the labour government have not been around lots of the country because there is massive green belt, building going on right now. i can, i could take you to a place great dunmow in, in essex. actually, it's been transformed. it used to be a very quiet kind of villagey place and now there are literally thousands of houses going up, and that's going on all over the place. so i'd be fascinated to see. i absolutely guarantee. so keep this, keep this clip that they will not

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build anything like 1.5 million if they get to a million within five years, it will be a miracle. well yeah. >> but also with rapid population growth and the levels of immigration both legal and illegal, we're expecting, i mean, it might not even touch the sides, but starmer's new government wasn't just content with ripping up planning rules. they've also reversed the ban on onshore wind farms. so here is newly minted energy secretary net zero minister ed miliband explaining the decision in a video he posted on social media. >> i've just come from the treasury. the onshore wind ban in england has been in place for more than nine years. we've been in government 72 hours, we've lifted it. that's the pace we're going to move at. we've got to become a clean energy superpower for energy independence, to cut bills, to create good jobs and tackle the climate crisis. we're getting on with it. >> yeah. he's the most expensive policymaker in british history. and now it appears that he's content to slap a load of wind turbines around the countryside, both ruining people's views and killing birds. >> calvin well, i okay, let's put it this way. i would rather i would rather have a little bit

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of an eyesore than i would have to have to import any putin or iranian or anybody else in the world dumping their oil at me and their cartels. so you don't even have a competitive market. so if we could guarantee energy security, actually, i wouldn't be massively hostile to the whole idea. look honestly, we're a small country. the problem is, we could actually, in order to supply all our energy need, we would actually have to carpet the whole country with with these rather unattractive pieces of glass. that is the problem with it , look, these are all at with it, look, these are all at the beginning. it all looks great. we're doing stuff. we're doing stuff. oh, well, after all, take a reeves. after all, she was telling us only half an hour ago before she got elected. we have no plans to. we have no plans to. oh, hold on a second. we've now got the worst economy since 1945, and now we are going to have a wealth tax and an inheritance tax . and anybody who inheritance tax. and anybody who has made anything of themselves in their lives is going to have

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to pay for the skint and the dim. >> well, this is exactly what i wanted to talk to you about now, because we could see this coming a mile off. we said it would happen. we just maybe didn't think it would happen this soon. she's already come out and said, oh, you know what, we've had a look at the book. yeah, we've had a look at the books and oh, let me tell you, were surprised at that one. oh, you know, and i opened it and it just screamed at me and i thought the worst for 80 years, didn't it? yeah it is. well, i think we've got a little clip of this. oh, right. >> yeah. it'll be interesting. >> yeah. it'll be interesting. >> i've repeatedly warned that whoever won the general election would inherit the worst set of circ*mstances since the second world war. what i have seen in the past 72 hours has only confirmed that that is . confirmed that that is. >> okay. so there we are. so that calvin, things are so much worse than we ever could have anticipated. well, we can't stick to our promises now. what >> do you know what obviously we've got to look after. we've got to have to look after those idiots who voted labour. okay? so they won't pay any more. and oh, by the way, the rich, they've all legged it to monaco,

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so they weren't playing. so who's left? it's going to be actually the middle classes sitting there. they haven't done anything wrong. they're just standing there and labour are going bang. and that's the beginning of it. so we're only we're half an hour into this government and already i'm afraid honestly the taxes are going to have to go up. we don't like doing this. but it's those nasty tories that were at fault. >> yeah. so they will have a situation now where they won't want to bring back austerity. so you think they are just going to clobber the middle class. >> and this is only the beginning. so there will be emergency budgets about every 20s in which slowly. and you'll be able to recognise anybody from the middle classes walking along the road. there will, they'll have that terrible downtrodden feeling about them. it's going it's going to be an absolute shocker this five years and the idea that at the end of it, this is the most ridiculous idea that there can possibly be growth and increases in taxes at the same time to the very class that actually create the wealth.

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it's impossible. and they knew it's impossible, but they're in power. god bless you for voting laboun >> all right, kelvin mackenzie, thank you very much. there. the former editor of the sun coming up, i'll ask andrew rosindell, one of the very few tories left standing, who he is backing to succeed rishi sunak as leader of the party. but next we've heard a bit about it. i'm going to delve into more detail. 64 illegal migrants have crossed the channel in today's small boats crisis. so will it be open season now for illegal migrants under a labour government? they've been given a lot of more incentives, haven't they, to make that journey? we'll be having a big debate about that as the star armada enters britain. stay tuned . britain. stay tuned. >> for that warm feeling inside from boxt boilers sponsors of weather on gb news >> hello. good evening. here's your latest gb news, weather

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coming to you from the met office. the weather's going to make it feel not much like july. as we go through the next 24 hours with some heavy, persistent rain pushing up from the south in association with a weather system that's already made its way across some southern parts so far today, the heaviest rain through this evening and overnight is going to be across parts of southwest england and south wales could see totals of 60 to 70mm over higher ground. some travel disruption and some flooding possible even elsewhere across much of england and wales. it is going to turn pretty wet overnight, but with that temperatures not dropping a huge amount, a different story further north across scotland, northern ireland, where we get any clear skies, temperatures will dip into mid single figures. taking a look closer at first thing tomorrow morning . first thing tomorrow morning. and by 6 or 7:00 in the morning, far southern parts of england. here the heavy, persistent rain will have cleared, but it's staying cloudy with some damp weather around. more persistent rain lingering across the central slice of the uk, and this rain will be starting to push its way into parts of

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northern ireland and perhaps the far south of scotland. but elsewhere across scotland, it's actually looking like a fairly decent morning. perhaps the best of the sunshine will be towards the west, a little bit cloudier towards the south and east through the rest of the day. we are going to see this band of rain continuing to edge further northwards, so spilling in across more parts of scotland, northern ireland and lingering across the far north of england. elsewhere further south, staying fairly cloudy and some outbreaks of rain around . but there should of rain around. but there should be some brighter breaks and in any sunshine. not feeling too bad. temperatures peaking around 21 or 22 celsius. generally, though, they are below average for the time of year. more very wet weather to come across far northern parts as we go through wednesday. a bit drier further south, maybe some sunny breaks at times, but also some showery outbreaks too. and there will be some more showers to come as we 90 some more showers to come as we go through thursday and friday. that being said, there is a drying trend so optimistically hoping for some drier weather by the weekend . the weekend. >> looks like things are heating up. boxt boilers sponsors of

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>> it's 10 pm. i'm patrick christys tonight, a starmer government offering them the green light to come across in their thousands. the star commander of illegal immigrants are on their way. but where will they live? >> we will reform the national planning policy framework, consulting on a new growth focused approach to the planning system. >> are they coming to a new housing development near you? or so a descendant of enslaved people , a black working class people, a black working class man from tottenham . wow. david man from tottenham. wow. david lammy immediately plays the race card but it's great the establishment media are really scrutinising labour. >> and have you unpacked yet? have you found your way around? >> meanwhile , the hunt for the >> meanwhile, the hunt for the next tory leader is on. >> i'm having lots of conversations with colleagues,

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but underlying all of this , of but underlying all of this, of course, we have to talk as a unified party and there's more terror in the skies. >> yes. have a look at that. how would you deal with it? i think i'd be screaming and desperately clambering for the exit, but i've got all of tomorrow's newspaper front pages today with express columnist carole malone, journalist benjamin butterworth and founder of global britain, amanda gal. oh, yes. and what do you think is going on here? >> they're really running at our car . oh dear . car. oh dear. >> get ready britain, here we go . >> get ready britain, here we go. the illegal migrant armada is on its way. next . its way. next. >> good evening. just after 10:00. this is the latest gb news. and rishi sunak has announced his interim

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conservative shadow cabinet. the first the party's led for 14 years. most of the former cabinet shadow their old roles. as with james cleverly taking on the home secretary. shadow home secretary portfolio and jeremy hunt as shadow chancellor. but the former foreign secretary, lord cameron, and the tory party chairman, richard holden, have both resigned. andrew mitchell is now slated in as the new shadow foreign secretary, while richard fuller, former economic secretary to the treasury, is the new conservative chairman. kemi badenoch is now shadowing angela rayner on housing and levelling up. but it's not yet clear just levelling up. but it's not yet clearjust how long these new clear just how long these new appointments will hold. as rishi sunak confirmed last week, he's intends to resign. well, the new labour government has admitted the summer will be challenging as the first boat full of migrants since the general election crossed the english channel this morning. the group of 64 illegal migrants was intercepted by border force officials and taken to a migrant

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processing centre in dover harbour. and then this afternoon, another boat also attempted to make the same crossing from france. it brings the total number of migrants so far this year to more than 13,500. that's up 12% on the same period last year. and it comes after sir keir starmer announced the rwanda scheme is dead and buried, claiming he's not to prepared continue with gimmick politics. well, the new chancellor of the exchequer outlined her plan to get britain building again at a news conference this morning, rachel reeves announced that she'd boost the uk's economic growth, adding it would be her national mission. she also promised major changes to speed up infrastructure projects and build thousands of new homes by shaking up local planning law . shaking up local planning law. >> well, the number one mission of this incoming labour government is to grow the economy and to grow the economy. we need to get britain building the status quo of always saying no to new development just isn't

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going to stand anymore. because if we continue like this, we will see living standards continue to decline, fewer and fewer people being able to get on the housing ladder, and we won't be generating the money that we need for our public services. we sought a mandate at the election to grow the economy, and we're determined to do just that. >> rachel reeves well, in news away from politics, boeing, the aircraft manufacturer, has agreed to pay a £190 million fine to the authorities in the united states to avoid a criminal trial trial over two crashes of its 737 max jetliners . crashes of its 737 max jetliners. the plane makers pleaded guilty to a fraud charge following the deaths of 346 passengers and crew in 2018 and 2019. families of the victims, though, have criticised that decision , saying criticised that decision, saying it allows boeing to avoid full responsibility for what happened and here at home, excitement is

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building now for the euros semi—final as england are set to take on the netherlands on wednesday. and it comes as england defender luke shaw says he's fit and ready to play. shaw is the only specialist left back in gareth southgate's squad and did not play in england's first four matches because of a hamstring injury, but the manchester united player is now ready to play a bigger part in england's campaign. those are the latest gb news headlines for now, i'm polly middlehurst. i'm back in an hour with more. see you then. >> for the very latest gb news direct to your smartphone, sign up to news alerts by scanning the qr code, or go to gbnews.com. forward slash alerts . gbnews.com. forward slash alerts. >> the so—called illegal migration star armada is on its way across the channel today.

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>> of course, we saw the first of those channel migrants arrive , of those channel migrants arrive, just a small number. initially 64 arrivals. >> today, thousands more are expected in the coming weeks and months. what was one of sir keir starmer's first acts as prime minister >> look, the rwanda scheme was dead and buried before it started. it's never been a deterrent and i'm not to prepared continue with gimmicks that don't act as a deterrent. >> well, there are also around 90,000 illegal migrants who will now have the chance to claim asylum. last week, sir keir starmer took this phone call from the us president to the prime minister. >> congratulations. what a hell of a victory. congratulation. >> thank you, mr president. it's been a long night and day. >> well, i know that many people will be wondering when he's scheduled for talks with the taliban and the ayatollah of iran to get some returns agreements set up with them. but today, our new home secretary, yvette cooper, was out telling us how her new plan to stop the

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boats was getting on. >> we're setting up a major new approach to law enforcement against the criminal gangs who are undermining our border security and putting lives at risk. this will be a major new border security command that will bring together the work of the national crime agency, the work of the border force, the work of the border force, the work that happens along the channel work that happens along the channel, but also the way that these networks stretch right across europe to go after the gangs that are profiting from this dangerous trade in people and undermining our borders. >> well, labour plans to build 1.5 million new social homes in their first term. angela rayner has urged every part of the uk to take its fair share of asylum seekers . labour are also looking seekers. labour are also looking to change planning laws, as we can hear here, we will reform the national planning policy framework, consulting on a new growth focused approach to the planning system before the end of the month, including restoring mandatory housing targets. well, the implication here could be that in your area

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you could see a large new housing development and asylum seekers will be allowed to live in that development. the message is clear if you're an illegal immigrant, isn't it? under laboun immigrant, isn't it? under labour, you currently have more of a chance of staying in britain than you did before. now apparently, the search for a leader of this uk border security command that yvette cooper was talking about started today, and they're expected to be appointed in the coming weeks. well, they'll have their work cut out, weren't they? let's get the thoughts on my panel this evening . i let's get the thoughts on my panel this evening. i am let's get the thoughts on my panel this evening . i am joined panel this evening. i am joined by daily express columnist carole malone. i've got journalist and broadcaster benjamin butterworth and the founder of global britain uk, amon berger . carole, founder of global britain uk, amon berger. carole, i'll founder of global britain uk, amon berger . carole, i'll start amon berger. carole, i'll start with love. i'll start with you on this. i'll start with you on this. i mean , realistically, is this. i mean, realistically, is this. i mean, realistically, is this just going to be open season now in the channel? >> of course it is. and starmer just lie. they said it didn't act as a deterrent. yes it did act as a deterrent. yes it did act as a deterrent. yes it did act as a deterrent. as deputy irish premier micheal martin, he said the reason for the 50% increase in migrants in april

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this year was because of precisely that, because people were frightened they were going to be earmarked for amanda. it wasn't a gimmick and it's a gimmick that actually many countries in europe are now employing, you know, having having people process in a safe third country. you know, we're abandoning it at a time when we gave the idea to many in europe. so yeah, i just think this is it's shocking. it's you mentioned it before, kevin saunders there, the chief of the ex—chief border force boss, he actually said it's going to be open season for all boats. now, he also said, and while starmer has dumped rwanda, he hasn't told us how he's going to do. we keep on hearing about this border security command. but we have a group exactly like that operating now and it's called it's called small boats operational command. there's a boss there. it's run by a guy called general shapps. yeah. so what staff are going to sack him? so what starmer's group going to do that's different? well, this is it to this one. this is exactly what james cleverly has been tweeting. >> he says a small boats operational command exists. has it been disabled? has general shapps been made redundant? will

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the small boats operational command staff be fired and then rehired? what's the difference between these two organisations that we already have and their functions? or is this just a gimmick? i mean, it is a gimmick, isn't it, benjamin? no clearly whatever exists at the moment isn't working because the numbers have continued to go up. >> clearly , rwanda wasn't a >> clearly, rwanda wasn't a great deterrent because the numbers went up after it was passed. and i'm sorry, but these reports in the telegraph and in the mail on sunday, the idea that refugees, migrants are sat in calais flicking through the labour manifesto, waiting for the change of prime minister. i'm sorry if they're that politically intuitive, we should be making them senior civil servants. they can, because the kurds in northern france have now nicknamed starmer as the friendly one. >> they and they have said how great he's going to be for illegal immigration. that's a great moniker to have, i think three days. >> the other difference here, amanda, the other key point of difference here now is that is, look, things were obviously not going well in the channel, all right. we can't get around that. and it remained. we will now never know whether rwanda would have had too much of an effect

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at all. and i do accept all of that. however, what we could have now is a labour government that says everywhere needs to take their fair share of asylum seekers. yeah, 90,000 at least more. being able to claim asylum. i would imagine the vast majority of those will now get asylum, because that's been the direction of travel for years and years and years. so when they're talking about building these new homes as well, you could go from having asylum seeker hotels or a detention centre to actually genuinely having a housing estate full of asylum seekers. >> well, we've already seen that in some parts of the country, patrick. i mean, i would say, look, we've gone from this whole campaign , starmer saying, i'm campaign, starmer saying, i'm going to smash the gang, smash the gangs. look i put my hand up and say, yes, we've had open borders , but starmer has done borders, but starmer has done with this. is he smashed the bloody doors off the borders. that's what he's done. i wouldn't be surprised by the end of this year, signing an agreement with the eu , taking in agreement with the eu, taking in not people by the boatload, but by the plain voters. >> he's actually he's actually said that already hasn't he, man? he said that we have not taken our fair share. exactly

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and one of the deals for us to get a closer relationship with the eu is for us to take 100,000 of, of the european migrants. >> so we'll stop the boats. he'll be flying in the planes. >> there's 190 with the 9401 and there's a there's 200,000 already before you start. and they're saying this year estimates are going to be between 60 and 100,000, but people are coming on boats. hitherto it's been about 30,000 max in a year. so this is going to nearly triple in the next yeah >> well, what is interesting is at the top of the last hour, we were talking about what he's done for prisons. now we already have mr timpson lined up to take over that role so that implied that they'd done some kind of pre—planning there for that issue. what we've had now with illegal immigration is the scrapping of the rwanda plan and some kind of job interview process starting today, supposedly for this new border force command thing. that to me does not imply that there's a party there that takes illegal immigration particularly seriously. you'll just scrap a deterrent even if people don't necessarily think it was a deterrent. and i accept that. but you'll scrap that and you'll start the process of finding someone who might come in to

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sort out terror laws, and then you'll pass the counter—terror laws, and then you'll work with our european friends. i mean, we're talking months and months and months here, aren't we, before anything is done. >> we've had years of nothing being done. so i'd say that's a much better timescale than we were looking at. but look, let's just be clear. you know, he stood on a manifesto saying he will scrap the rwanda plan and one the biggest swing in parliamentary history. well so thatis parliamentary history. well so that is you're welcome. >> you're welcome to oppose it is your own preference. >> but this is an election and a democracy in which they just chose this result. >> but why hasn't he said, why hasn't he told us his plan for stopping the boats? because he hasn't. all we know is that they're setting up a new border security command. we have one already. they're setting up their version. why hasn't he said what else he's going to do to stop the boats? >> well, i know that he has said what you just referenced about having a quota of people to come oveh having a quota of people to come over, and i think that is a much better idea. stop the boats, fly the planes, because then we can manage the situation. you don't get a scenario where you've got people overflowing into every town in hotels and barges and everything. well, it's much

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easier when you can plan for it. what if you fly over 100,000? >> that's much easier. >> that's much easier. >> that's much easier. >> that takes away the incentive for these heinous criminal gang masters. what it does is basically putting these people in. so you become the gang masters yourself. >> just say on this. keir starmer has been very, very selective with his choice of words throughout this election campaign, saying nobody but nobody should be making that journey across the channel. there's two ways of taking that. there's two ways of taking that. there is. i don't want these small boat arrivals. they're illegal immigrants. or there is what i suspect he does mean, which is which is a really horrendous, dangerous journey for these people. and we don't want to see anyone lose their lives in the channel. okay, fine. and i just wonder whether or not some kind of quota system or not some kind of quota system or whatever we're going to get from labour will do nothing to alleviate people's fears about many people who people still regard as being illegal immigrants. but will just physically stop the boats. so. right. we might not get people drowning in the channel, but we're still going to get loads of numbers of people and they are going to be here permanently. >> that's what's going to happen. i mean, let's let's be honest, the british people voted to punish the conservative party for doing exactly what starmer is going to turbocharge and put

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on steroids. >> yeah. and to be clear on that, the only people who would be benefited really are the illegal migrants. they would now not have to take that journey. the uber service across the channel would be turned into a shuttle to stop us having a quota, and the boats illegal as well. >> what's stopping you? >> what's stopping you? >> take away the boats? >> take away the boats? >> well, if they don't have to make that journey, then you destroy the business model. well not if you. >> well, we shouldn't be having to take them in in the first place. >> not if you're not part of the quota on a humanitarian level. >> that is a significant point of not if you're not. >> we don't have vulnerable people dying in our water. >> then you become the gangmasters yourself. >> you smash the gangs by becoming the gang. really well, you don't because you do. >> a democratically elected government choosing a number of refugees to enter the country is not comparable. >> why should we be taking in any single one? >> when you make countries that make drugs legal, you think that's going to get rid of the drug smugglers? >> no, it doesn't because they operate in a different way. and that's exactly what. >> all right. look coming up, has the establishment media been far too gushing about sir keir starmer during his first few days in office? i'm going to get

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the views of my panel. i'm also going to play you a couple of clips, which i think articulate that pretty well. and i will have the very first of tomorrow's newspaper front pages. but next, is it going to be oh, sorry, is this going to be oh, sorry, is this going to be the next leader of the conservative party? >> but underlying all of this of course, we have to talk as a unified party. >> well, victoria atkins is pitching herself as the unity candidate, but suella braverman robert jenrick, they're also front runners. you've got priti patel as well. tory mp andrew rosindell joins me live in the studio to reveal who he's backing

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welcome back to patrick christys tonight. now, shortly, i'll give you a first look at tomorrow's newspaper front pages. but first with another conservative leadership contest. just around the corner. i'm joined live in the corner. i'm joined live in the studio by tory mp andrew rosindell. yes, the race to replace rishi sunak will take shape in the next few weeks. several high profile conservatives are refusing to rule themselves out of that race. >> i'm having lots of conversations with colleagues. i'm very flattered and very encouraged by what people are saying to me, but this is a really difficult time for our party. >> we need to ask ourselves some very hard questions about delivery , about integrity, and delivery, about integrity, and also about our values. but underlying all of this, of course , we have to talk as a

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course, we have to talk as a unified party. >> i honestly don't think that three days on from a general election in which we've just lost so many of our friends and colleagues that it is right to have self—indulgent conversations like this, the reason i came on your programme, laura, is because i care about the conservative party, former home secretary priti patel is also believed to be a contender , also believed to be a contender, but she's not said much beyond offering her support to england as they battle through the euros. >> a weekend poll of times newspaper readers showed tom tugendhat as their preferred candidate, followed by kemi badenoch and james cleverly. and with the 1922 committee due to elect their new chairman for the backbench mps tomorrow, the timetable for the leadership contest should be in place very soon. so we should know soon, shouldn't we? well andrew rosindell joins me now. will you be the next leader of the conservative party? >> well, someone got to do it. and we need someone that's got courage , integrity, principle, courage, integrity, principle, someone that's not afraid to say

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it as it is. and that's where we've gone wrong. we've had too many leaders and too many cabinet ministers who have not really got to where the british people want us to be, and that's why we've lost. so we need someone with a bit of gumption. >> it's not you. you could do it. you could put yourself in the ring. >> look, any one of us could do the job. but i want someone of character and principle who's going to stand up and put this country first. that's what the british people want. the reason they voted out of office is that they voted out of office is that they didn't think we were looking after the best interests of our country, and the government appeared incompetent. so they voted reform and many of my colleagues unfortunately lost their seats. we've got to get this sorted out for the next election. otherwise we're going to have years and years of a labour government. and that's something i really don't want to see. >> well, i will take note of the fact that you've not ruled yourself out, but why would you? you shouldn't rule yourself out at this stage. but of the people that we've rattled through a bit there, you've got pretty, you've got suella, you've got robert jenrick. and as you could maybe say the right i'll probably put kemi badenoch in that as well.

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you know, only one of those that you'd be more favourable towards. well, look, i want someone that is going to bring the right of centre back together again. >> it's simple mathematics, patrick. we can't win an election if our vote is cut in half. so if you have two right of centre parties, one conservative, one reform. and let's face it, we agree on most things. there are some issues where we may may disagree, but generally speaking, both the right of centre parties, if that happens, who's going to win? i'll tell you who's going to win labour every single time. so the mathematics of this are simple. in our electoral system , which in our electoral system, which is first past the post, you need the right of centre parties to coalesce how that's going to happen. how are we going to achieve it with all the characters and personalities involved? i do not know what i do know is that unless we do that, the likelihood is that you're going to have a second and a third and even a fourth term of a labour government. >> some of the people that are in the running at the moment, you've got tom tugendhat for

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example, victoria atkins, i'm not sure they meet your description. do they though? look, we lost votes, not because we were too right wing, frankly. >> we lost votes because we seem to be indistinguishable from the labour party, the liberals. we were mush in the middle and most people do vote reform vote reform because we weren't conservative enough . we didn't conservative enough. we didn't have this problem when mrs. thatcher was prime minister and leader, because everyone knew where they stood with her. they didn't always agree with her necessarily, but they knew she was someone of courage who stood up and said what she believed in, and she did what she said. now, in recent times, that's not happened. and i think people are very disillusioned with us. so if we want to get a chance of winning a future election, we have to bring everyone back together again. but we must do so in the interests of the country. so we have to have the right principles if we're too wishy washy, if we muddle our words, and if we aren't clear about what we for , stand why about what we for, stand why should people vote for us? >> yeah, indeed . the interesting

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>> yeah, indeed. the interesting thing of all of this is there seems to be some ongoing debate, doesn't there, about whether or not the conservative party needs to occupy the centre ground again, or whether or not it needs to be essentially right wing and you are saying that this conservative rebuild needs to be a right wing rebuild. >> so in a democracy, you give people a choice of voting for political parties. if all the political parties. if all the political parties. if all the political parties are one mush and you can't really distinguish between them, that's not really democracy. that's actually fooling people into voting for one party, when in fact they're getting something different. i think we need, in this country a proper right of centre party, a conservative party that upholds traditional values of this country. >> just just on that. i'm sorry to interrupt, but i think it's quite a good point because you mentioned that a few times about having one coherent right wing party. does that do you think in practical terms, not tomorrow or the week after, but maybe a year or two down the line look a bit like an amalgamation with

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reform, do you think? >> well, it inevitably, because reform is essentially a breakaway from the conservative party. the vast majority of people in reform are the kind of people in reform are the kind of people that i could sit with and agree on. about 90% of things, and most of them are ex conservative members. so this is a family feud. conservative members. so this is a family feud . that's how i see a family feud. that's how i see it. it's a family feud. we need to bring the family back together again, because the real enemy of this country, the real enemy, is socialism. and my fear, having been in the conservative party for over 40 years and having joined because of margaret thatcher and believing in what she stood for, i see the conservative party of having lost its way completely. so we need to get back on track. >> what do you do about involving the members in the decision for the next tory party leader , though? leader, though? >> well, the members have to have a say. it's completely wrong that it's a it's a closed shop within the parliamentary party. the problem is patrick and i'm probably a different than most of my colleagues because i'm very much in tune with the members and our voters.

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a lot of them are not. a lot of them see things very differently, so that the political makeup of the parliamentary party is often been much more to the centre. when our voters and our members are much more to the right of centre. so there's a disconnect so that has to be sorted out. the parliamentary party cannot wag the dog. you know, we are the mps , but at the end of the the mps, but at the end of the day, the tail cannot wag the dog and if the dog is going in a certain direction and that's what's needed, we need to reflect that. >> if you end up with somebody that has not been voted for by the members. so some kind of jiggery pokery the members. so some kind of jiggery pokery takes place there, and that person happens to be someone who you've described as being a bit useless here. technically so someone who's a bit centre, who does not resonate with the members would you consider moving to reform ? you consider moving to reform? >> no, i'm not going to join any other party. i've only ever been in the conservative party. i believe the conservative party is a great national institution, but sometimes it loses its way. it's not the first time it's

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happened and we need a strong leader to put us back on track again. now, margaret thatcher did that. boris did that. he won an 80 seat majority. now i think things went rather pear shaped when the pandemic came along. and we could have done a whole lot more with that 80 seat majority. but what they did to him was an outrage. you know, one of our most successful prime ministers was stabbed in the back, pushed out of office. they did the same to margaret thatcher. liz tried her best to get things back on track, but we know what that went wrong as well. so they pushed her out. people are bored of it. they think we're incompetent. they think we're incompetent. they think we're incompetent. they think we're all fighting amongst ourselves . and what i want to do ourselves. and what i want to do at the moment is to listen to all the leadership contenders and see who actually has a clear vision for our country, and potentially put yourself on that list. i'm not going to rule anything out, and no one should. i'm going to say to you, patrick, and i'm saying to all the leadership contenders, we need to get our party back on track. the other side of it is party organisation. it's too centralised. local constituencies don't function like they should. it's all top

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down and that's got to change. we've got to be a grassroots party we've got to be a grassroots party again and that's what i want to see. >> andrew, thank you very much for your time and congratulations on keeping hold of your seats as well. it must be said so, yeah, we'll we'll watch this space when it comes to andrew rosindell, that is of course, the tory mp for romford, andrew rosindell. coming up, how sir keir starmer got an easy ride from the establishment media during his first few days in office. >> and have you unpacked yet? have you found your way around ? have you found your way around? >> yeah, that, by the way, is just one of several clips like that. but next, my panel returned to quiz you through the very first of tomorrow's newspaper front pages, and there will be

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okay. welcome back to patrick christys tonight. and i have got the very first look at tomorrow's newspaper front pages for you . we start with the for you. we start with the metro. thousands stranded as flights act. groundhog day. yes. another summer, another day of chaos. another summer, another day of chaos . airlines, apparently. can chaos. airlines, apparently. can you guess it? yeah. it's those

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french air traffic controllers again. good stuff. do a day's work , lads. anyway, the work, lads. anyway, the independent nhs nursing's day of shame. damning reviews sparked by our reporting, finds health regulator turned a blind eye to serious sexual, physical and racial abuse in the nhs. they describe a toxic and dysfunctional culture. we also go to the i now reeves ready for war over uk's green belt as she vows to take on the nimbys. that's fine, although i wonder whether or not she might also find herself taking on the environmental lot. because there are, there are. there's a difference, isn't there, between people who don't want the field at the back of their house being built on, and people who are willing to dig themselves into that field and live there until you discover a rare species of newt and then you can't do it. yeah, the daily express, so what's it to be? tax rises or cuts to our services? rachel reeves raised the spectre of punishing tax rises this autumn, as she warned the worst public finances since world war two. we've said it before. we'll say it again. this was inevitable.

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she rolls the wicket for tax rises. let's go to the daily mail. putin bombs children's cancer hospital atrocity that shows why britain and nato must spend more on defence. as sir keir starmer and western leaders gather for a military summit. well, you know, we've got a new government now . putin's probably government now. putin's probably going to try on a bit more, isn't he? this is part of the, i hate to use the word game because it does involve literally sick children. but in the game of realpolitik and military, i'm afraid this is the kind of thing that happens. he'll be gauging our reaction, won't he? the guardian labour to fix the front door of the nhs by diverting billions to local surgeries. streeting pledges to fund gps as he heads for talks with junior doctors. will be watching that very closely again . watching that very closely again. is this another one where labour party are putting a lot of stock in their magic wand, or we're in charge now, will just be able to sort this, and i am going to whizz through a couple of the front pages with my wonderful panel front pages with my wonderful panel, but i do also have quite an interesting guest on actually, because the dust

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hasn't even settled yet on the election, and already reform uk are at the centre of a rather bizarre storm after the party was forced to deny accusations that they fielded fake candidates at the election. doubts were raised about candidates who stood without providing biographies, contact details or even photographs. and it was this ai generated picture of the party's candidate in the clapham and brixton hill constituency , mark matlock, that constituency, mark matlock, that set tongues wagging . people were set tongues wagging. people were saying this guy's fake, he doesn't exist . we can't track doesn't exist. we can't track him down. the guardian wrote a piece on it . several other him down. the guardian wrote a piece on it. several other media outlets have written a piece about it. well, we did just a small piece of legwork, and i'm pleased to say we are now joined by the man at the centre of this story, mark matlock . mark. well, story, mark matlock. mark. well, are you real? >> patrick i hope i'm here. am i here, am i real? >> you are . and you're a real >> you are. and you're a real man, are you mark? >> i hope so. repeat back to me.

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if i'm live , i one thing i'd if i'm live, i one thing i'd like to point out . i'm really like to point out. i'm really pleased that andrew rosindell mentioned a few of the partial failures of the conservative party and what to led this massive movement in reform and once again, i'd like to thank every single person who voted reform. this is an amazing movement and we will continue to do amazing things. >> okay. all right. >> okay. all right. >> how did it make you feel that people thought that you were an ai generated bot ? ai generated bot? >> i loved it free advertisem*nt. it's great. you know, i mean, i, i come from a very humble background. i've never really kind of taken part in social media. and tonight, you know, i've been i've been made like a star on twitter. i mean, i couldn't i couldn't have i could never have imagined that this would be the case. it's fantastic. thank you to all the extremists that have done this for me. by the way, i'm recovering from pneumonia. there

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are genuine reasons why i couldn't make the count. i'm still recovering. i've lost my voice. but i'm up and about, and you've empowered me to continue fighting this tremendous campaign. well, all right, good for you. >> i mean, you seem full of beans, mark, to be honest with you, for a bloke who many people thought was was simply an i picture. you have been unwell. you say you've been unwell, you couldn't go to the count. i understand that, and this campaign presumably was only a few weeks old with the election and everything. and can i just ask, you know, when they've been writing reports about the fact that you are a fake and a phoney? have, anyone from the guardian or anyone like that tried to contact you, >> you know what? i've spoken to many journalists, and i have to say, you know, to their credit, a lot of them have been truly wonderful , a lot of them have been truly wonderful, magnificent people who've understood my situation. you know, there have been a few who have used this opportunity to make headline news, and i call it fake news. you know, there's a massive agenda that's out to get our party, and

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they've used this opportunity to do so. but look, you know, they're not all bad people. a lot of them are being good people. and you know, it is what it is. >> all right. well look, mark, i will leave you to rest up and well done for coming on tonight. >> and i'm glad you're real. i'm glad we glad we got to see you. so thank you very, very much. and, you take care. you're obviously in. patrick. i'm pleased. >> i'm real too. thank god i love ipsis. >> oh, trump . british politics, >> oh, trump. british politics, british politics, everybody. it is magnificent. all right, well, there we go. and he seemed i thought he seemed real. >> he's real. but that's pneumonia i mean i want what he's got. yeah well he probably just keeled over now hasn't he. >> he's just summoned up all his energy for that. but bless him. well there we go. it looks to me i'm. i'm sold. i think he's real enough to me anyway. now. well, he might have just the tories out, but with only 34% of the vote share, keir starmer's election victory was far from a popular triumph. but that hasn't stopped the establishment media from fawning over the new prime

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minister. have a look at this and have you unpacked yet? >> have you found your way around? >> if you'd indulge us? >> if you'd indulge us? >> millions of people saw that exit poll drop. >> some of them gasped. >> some of them gasped. >> what was your emotion when you saw it? >> having a stable government that will be there for five, maybe ten years? who knows? but with sort of ordinary to down earth, serious people talking like the rest of us in charge of the government and a plan that doesn't shift very much for investment is going to mean a wall of money coming into this country from around the world, a wall of money coming into this country from around the world. >> former bbc journalist turned podcasting leftie jon sopel said i don't want to do the whole prophetic fallacy thing. but as starmer drives to downing street, the sun comes out. what a contrast to may 22nd, when sunak launched his campaign . sunak launched his campaign. carol, do you trust the our establishment media are going to hold starmer's feet to the fire, well, no , because people like well, no, because people like rigby and marr and sopel, they've never been any different. >> they've always been like

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that. i mean, the bloke that asked the question in the beginning who said, you know, you know , what's your face? you know, what's your face? that's that's a perfectly legitimate question. but the other ones, you know, rigby, marr and sopel, they've been they're leftie fanatics, always have been. so what they say is kind of normal. >> benjamin look , you know what? >> benjamin look, you know what? this just shows why right wingers are losing so badly. because you are obsessed with blaming the media, blaming the courts, blaming the public, blaming the wokeist, blaming the transgenders. you'll blame anyone, but take account for the fact that the public has rejected the message we have. >> seriously, how do you think they would have greeted you know, boris johnson 2.0 there? well, if suella braverman had just won the election for the tories or something, do you think she'd have got those questions ? questions? >> i think the question of what's it like to win an election? how are you adjusting to be prime minister? is a human interest question any journalist should ask, and that regular people that aren't obsessed with politics want to know the human side of adjusting to that ? side of adjusting to that? >> you know, stupid. you know, stupid. look at this. the sun care. a wall of money is going

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to come into britain . andrew to come into britain. andrew marr a wall of money. >> well, i think i think andrew marr summed it up in his own words. he said, these are people who will finally speak like us, and that's what it is. the establishment media and this new labour government , they are they labour government, they are they are glove in hand, hand in glove. that's what it's going to be for the next five years. it's going to be no scrutiny of this man. >> look, as a failed tory mp, i'm happy for you to go on about attacking everyone else because you will just continue to lose until you look at the mess that your own house. give it a look, because all the other sections of the media are going to help fire the people they will. >> but it took the labour party disaffection with how promise is not being delivered to get elected for the first time since i am pleased when he says. >> andrew marr says they talk like us. that's because now we have two cabinet ministers from parrs wood high in didsbury, in greater manchester and zero from eton. that is what the country looks like. >> where are the working class people about that? where are the workers? there are 74 labour mps from the tony blair foundation, very triumphalist about the government. >> there has only been around

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for three days. just give it a week. >> all these people that went on about, oh, labour doesn't understand the working classes. >> where are the working class , >> where are the working class, working class people in the cabinet. >> and you're going, oh, but doesit >> and you're going, oh, but does it matter? >> where are the working class saying, give them a month and see how they go? all right, all right, all right. we'll find out. >> now, after weeks of speculation, joe biden has thrown down the gauntlet to those calling for him to go dafing those calling for him to go daring them to challenge him at the democratic party convention next month. indeed, the us president made this rousing rallying cry at a campaign event over the weekend. >> well, let me say this as clearly as i can. i'm staying in the race. yes i'll beat donald trump. >> i will beat him again in 2020. >> i'll beat him again in 2020. all right, joe el tel, get him going, won't it? and reports are emerging today that the geriatric president needs instructions to show him to how reach the podium. does he really have any hope of defeating

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trump, whether it's in 2024 or back in time to 2020? i'm not sure. coming up, anneliese dodds has been made minister for women despite being unable to define what a woman is. is this a massive mistake from sir keir starmer? we debate that in tonight's greatest britain and union jackass. plus, this was david lammy's first message as the new foreign secretary, a descendant of enslaved people, a black working class man from tottenham . okay, so his identity tottenham. okay, so his identity politics here to stay under labouh politics here to stay under labour. and i've got a few more front pages for you as stay

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welcome back. i've got some more front pages for you. now let's do it . i'm front pages for you. now let's do it. i'm going to start with the times, pressure on starmer to raise defence spending. they've said this is after putin bombed a children's hospital in

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kyiv. let's go to the telegraph. rowling backs prime minister over new women's minister anneliese dodds. sorry attacks, not backs. good grief. now, i misread that rowling attacks prime minister over new women's minister anneliese dodds failed to define the word woman and pledged to rewrite gender laws. so yeah, he's got off to a great start there, doesn't he? with anneliese dodds and tony blair has predicted a £50 billion labour tax raid. lovely. interesting. he didn't predict that. did he, before the election. but now now we've had the election and it's and it's happened. >> i think tony blair did any interviews during the election which i noted. yeah they put gordon brown out. but for the first time in a long time they didn't use tony blair. >> no. and maybe it's because of stuff like that. but now labour have only been in power for a few days and already we're seeing identity politics being rammed down our throats. here's david lammy's first message as our new foreign secretary >> it is the honour of my life to stand before you as foreign secretary, a descendant of enslaved people, a black working

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class man from tottenham, a community which has never produced a foreign secretary before. >> right . before. >> right. great. diane abbott has also come under fire for this tweet criticising reform uk. she says giants of the engush uk. she says giants of the english football team. meanwhile, reform is complaining about immigration and that's a picture of the five england footballers with diverse backgrounds there. carol david lammy piping up immediately about being the descendants of enslaved people. will he make that? >> it's just it's beyond pathetic, actually. he talks about like he's the only non—white person to ever be in cabinet. fact, liz truss's cabinet, seven non—white members and ten women. sunak's cabinet, five non—white members and a non—white pm. starmer's cabinet free non—white members despite 89 ethnic minority mps being elected in this election. so they're not that diverse and they're not that diverse and they're not. >> they just shout about it more. benjamin. >> yeah, well, the vast majority of those mps are probably just been elected. so i think

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regardless of their description, they're not right for cabinet. >> it doesn't take away from the fact three non—white people in their cabinet. >> i think we i think, you know, david lammy is clearly a role model, but especially a role model, but especially a role model to the kind of black people in tottenham, which is a very poor area where he comes from, you know, regardless of your politics of a working class black lad from tottenham in north london, a really poor place, who got into harvard and is now become the foreign secretary, is an exceptional story. >> okay, look, let's be honest . >> okay, look, let's be honest. >> okay, look, let's be honest. >> david lammy, the same man who called the black and white smoke that came out when the pope was announced racist, didn't he? didn't he did. he did say that he deleted his tweet. he apologised for it afterwards, confused what the smoke colour meant. he didn't know. he said that it was racist. but how can you that? well, the point here is identity politics doesn't transfer into skills and wisdom. no, and that's what we're facing with this government. okay. yeah. >> but i think, i think a harvard educated lawyer with 15 years in parliament, 20 years in

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parliament, patronising, that is pretty intelligent. >> you sound as if you're working class and you're a person of colour. you're not going to do well. i mean, okay, let's let's break this down. >> it's the fact that being harvard educated is stacked against you. >> and he clearly is incredibly competent. >> so he's the antonym of ofwat, a working class person is supposed to be. he's a harvard educated, well , he's called educated, well, he's called trump all these things. how is he going to deal with him as foreign secretary? >> not sure he will. i think that's the rumour, isn't it, that's the rumour, isn't it, that david lammy might not actually be our foreign secretary, if indeed trump is elected? but there we go. now, in other rather bizarre news, itv have decided to put trigger warnings on their long running detective series midsomer murders. yep, you heard that right. the broadcaster is going detention for adding trigger warnings such as may contain violence and crime scene images with hundreds of murders, deaths and attempted murders spanning over the show's 27 year history. carol, your reaction? >> i love midsomer murders. you know what? but the thing is, this is the death count is staggeringly silly. you know, there's an average of five die

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in every episode, and up until april 23 last year, the murder count was was 126 episodes, was 395. if you count all the people that have pegged it, it's 581. over all these episodes. so it is a ridiculous. we don't watch it for that. and, you know, this is entertainment. we watch it for the scenery and the sunshine because the sun always shines in midsomer. >> i watch it for the murders. >> i watch it for the murders. >> well, no you don't, but they are bloody murders. but they are. they're comedic. almost. yeah, but do you need trigger? >> i mean, is this. >> no, you don't need a trigger warning. it's stupid. >> well, we're at really, i mean, were people. siri, i'm going to read a right of reply here. the guide this is from itv. the guidance for episodes of midsomer murders streaming on itv, has always been in place and it is included for itv one transmission. so if you watch something called midsomer murders, do you need to be told that there might be a bit of murder? >> well, i mean, what next? are we going to put viewers discretion on dad's army for? let's be honest, fighting and making fun of the nazis. let's be honest, fighting and making fun of the nazis . what's making fun of the nazis. what's next? i mean, this is going

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bonkers, but this is again prevalent of the woke culture wars that we've faced. and we're going to face even more. >> but why does it take them so long? midsomer murders have been going for decades now. why have they just suddenly realised five are dying every episode? >> well, it's probably because they're now they've just they've just been properly employed. some new woke pr person. >> if you've ever seen it. people die in the most hideous, horrific ways. i mean, heads chopped off, you know? i mean, it's just bloody. i chopped off, you know? i mean, it'sjust bloody. i am pleased it's just bloody. i am pleased to announce my new pr job with itv . itv. >> i love these stuff. that one's all right. all right. we're going to go to today's greatest britain on union jackass now. all right. so let's start with greatest britain. carol, who is yours? >> mine is nigel farage. you know, he just. yes. reform just got five seats, but i think his voice is the voice we really need to hear in parliament. he got more than 4 million votes. our system should have accommodated for more than that. but first of all, he needs to get rid of the idiots in his party. i think. but, you know, i think he was the real star of this election. >> okay. all right. benjamin. >> okay. all right. benjamin. >> well, the real star of the election, the man that got the

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biggest swing in history. he did not. he did, he did. >> he got less votes than corbyn got when he lancaster majority less votes. >> is the prime minister sir keir starmer who just achieved doesn't want to use the word sir. 200 socialist, 211 mps. he gained, which is the biggest in history by more than 65 mps. >> all right, well go on. amman, jordan pickford for saving that penalty. >> national hero he is indeed he is indeed. >> all right okay. so today's winner of the greatest britain goes to. it's nigel farage. i must say it was a close run thing between him and jordan i celebrate losers. okay. >> all right. lose >> all right. lose >> well, now we go to union. jackass. time carroll. who's your union jackass? >> it's emma raducanu . i can't >> it's emma raducanu. i can't see any radical because, you know , when she won the us open know, when she won the us open when she was 18 and 2020, whatever it was, yeah, she was brilliant, but she's just not. not done very much ever since. yes. she's rich, she's made millions. but that's all with celebrity endorsem*nts. and it seems to me she's she's more of a celebrity than. >> do you think she'll let andy

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murray down? >> i think she let him down badly. and i know anne diamond has been castigated on social media, and here i go. and i'm going to say that i totally agree with her. you know. you know, you don't agree. he phoned and he asked her. she said yes. and then she said, well, i've got a bad wrist. can't do it. well you know, it's not on. and he got to play his last game with his brother and he lost. >> okay. all right. well, well there we go. benjamin. who's your union jack. >> well this was an easy one this week. it's a table dancing menace captured on camera. it's patrick christys . patrick christys. >> i think we can play a little clip now. this was our election watch party, and this is me getting a strong telling off from the woman who was running the venue. oh, you are? yeah so she was not happy. >> what did she say to you? >> what did she say to you? >> she was not happy. she said she grabbed me and she pointed at me, and she just said, get off that table now. get off it. so whoever you are, i need to get off it. i got on my knees

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your union jackass. >> it's got to be anneliese dodds, the new minister for women who can't actually define a woman, part time minister. all right. and her, of course. her pronouns are up on the government website, and it is. they is that true? that is true. obviously not true . that is obviously not true. that is those that is on the gov.uk website. tonight is it true? >> all right. well i haven't, i apparently i don't know it might have been changed. i don't know we'll have to wait and see. >> are your pronouns are easy because your names are. >> man, i've not got them. fair enough. all right. today's winner of the union. jackass is me. patrick christys for dancing on a table and getting thrown off and indeed told off by the woman who organised the events. thank you very much. thank you very much, everybody. headliners are up next. i'll see you tomorrow at nine. >> hey, buddy. >> hey, buddy. >> a brighter outlook with boxt solar, sponsors of weather on gb news >> hello. good evening. here's your latest gb news. weather coming to you from the met

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office . the weather's going to office. the weather's going to make it feel not much like july as we go through the next 24 hours with some heavy , hours with some heavy, persistent rain pushing up from the south in association with a weather system that's already made its way across some southern parts so far today, the heaviest rain through this evening and overnight is going to be across parts of southwest england and south wales could see totals of 60 to 70mm over higher ground. some travel disruption and some flooding possible even elsewhere across much of england and wales. it is going to turn pretty wet overnight, but with that temperatures not dropping a huge amount a different story further north across scotland, northern ireland, where we get any clear skies, temperatures will dip into mid single figures. taking a look closer at first thing tomorrow morning . and by 6 or tomorrow morning. and by 6 or 7:00 in the morning, far southern parts of england. here the heavy, persistent rain will have cleared, but it's staying cloudy with some damp weather around. more persistent rain lingering across the central slice of the uk, and this rain will be starting to push its way into parts of northern ireland and perhaps the far south of

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scotland. but elsewhere across scotland, it's actually looking like a fairly decent morning. perhaps the best of the sunshine will be towards the west, a little bit cloudier towards the south and east through the rest of the day we are going to see this band of rain continuing to edge further northwards, so spilling in across more parts of scotland, northern ireland and lingering across the far north of england. elsewhere further south, staying fairly cloudy and some outbreaks of rain around . some outbreaks of rain around. but there should be some brighter breaks and in any sunshine. not feeling too bad. temperatures peaking around 21 or 22

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>> it's 11:00. >> it's11:00. you're with gb news in a moment. headliners. but first, let's bring you the latest news headlines and rishi sunak has announced his interim conservative shadow cabinet. that's the first the party has led for more than 14 years. most

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of the former cabinet shadow their old roles, with james cleverly for example, taking shadow home secretary and jeremy hunt as shadow chancellor. but the former foreign secretary, lord cameron, and tory party chairman richard holden have both resigned. andrew mitchell is the new shadow foreign secretary, while richard fuller, former economic secretary to the treasury, is the new conservative party chairman. kemi badenoch is now shadowing angela rayner on housing and levelling up. but it's not yet clear how long these new appointments will be in place. as rishi sunak confirmed last week he will eventually resign. well, today the new labour government admitted the summer will be challenging as the first boat full of migrants since the general election crossed the engush general election crossed the english channel this morning. the group of 64 illegal migrants was intercepted by border force officials and taken to a migrant processing centre in dover harbour this afternoon, though another boat also attempted but

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failed to make the crossing from

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